Congress’s fumbling, BJP’s determination


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I find the situation in Manipur and (especially) Goa comical. Even though the BJP is not the single largest party, it is set to form the govt. in both states.

Personally, I felt the BJP lost the people’s mandate in Goa and perhaps should have refrained from forming the govt. for moral reasons. Their sitting chief minister and six cabinet ministers lost elections. With 17 members, the Congress party should have moved forward with govt. formation.

However, the fumblings of the Congress party is what making the situation comical. With six former chief ministers fighting amongst themselves, they could not agree on who should be the party’s legislative leader. While the Congress party fought, the BJP moved swiftly to get the necessary support from the other parties and independents. You could clearly see BJP’s hunger, determination, and strategic brilliance when they dispatched a leader from UP with ties to the wrestling federation to win over an independent MLA in Goa who was also, wait for it, a fellow member of the wrestling federation!

Just for these reasons, I don’t mind the BJP’s moves. While morally questionable, politically it seems to be a prudent move. The situation also demonstrates how bereft the Congress has become of good, strong leadership. They (and a section of the English media) have no business of blaming the BJP of poor sportsmanship.

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Social Activists, why do you hate Modi, the administrator ?


I am not going write about Gujarat’s development here. It is a well known fact that Gujarat and Bihar are the two states, making rapid strides in terms of development and good administration. Rest of the country seems to be caught up into political corruptions and scams. Yet it seems to be a cardinal sin to praise the developmental and administrative efforts of Narendra Modi , the chief minister of Gujarat. Anna Hazare, Deoband VC Ghulam Mohammad Vastanvi and others have faced the ire of social activists for praising the administration of Narendra Modi. If something is good, then what’s the harm in praising it ? People are not praising Modi’s role in the 2002 roits, rather they are praising the development and progress he bought about in the state in the past nine years. While Modi’s past remains questionable,  how long that one event should be used to judge Modi ? Shouldn’t his more recent past and the present be a judging factor ?

But say what you want to, these so called “social secular activists” love to spew venom about Modi. They seem can’t get over 2002. It seems as if they want to keep Modi confined to Gujarat. Its time that these activists start differentiating between Modi the administrator that has been around post riots from Modi, the chief minister during the riots.

… And the Loser is …


The Common Man ! Yes, the loser in the latest (and never ending) controversy of “Mumbai konachya baapachi” (whom does Mumbai or Bombay or whatever you want to call it belongs to) is you, me and everyone else who loves and lives in the city.  I don’t want to take sides; neither am I supporting any one here. Just think about the parties involved in this whole situation and what they gained or lost.

Let us look at the winners first  –

Rahul Gandhi – The young heir of the Congress party comes to Mumbai and takes on the tiger in his own den successfully. He gained a lot of political mileage and this will definitely help him build up his stature in the Congress party and in the country further.

Shahrukh Khan and his movie – After the controversy, I know people who have said that they will watch the movie “My Name is Khan” just because they want to support Mr.Khan or oppose the other party. Even Rajdeep Sardesai (editor in chief of CNN-IBN) tweeted saying that people should watch the movie for this very reason ! If the movie hits the screen successfully, good for Mr.Khan and the movie; whether it is good or not people are going to watch it any ways ! (PS – I will probably watch the movie because it has got decent to good reviews and I liked the music of the movie)

The Media – The media as always played the judge and the jury ! Trial by media has its own advantages and disadvantages.  With so much to talk about and an audience to sell it to, I wonder whether the ad rates were higher than usual when the controversy was at its peak …

The Shiv Sena – If we look at the last two elections, the Lok Sabha and then following Vidhan Sabha elections, the only issue MNS had was the “marathi manoos” issue. For a party that is just three years old, boy did they do well ! They polled over a hundred thousand votes in each of the 4 seats they contested in Mumbai. In the assembly elections they went on to win 10 seats on the issue of “marathi manoos” ! Going by this logic, the Shiv Sena may attract voters back towards them. It will be interesting to see how the voting takes place in the BMC elections that will take place next year.

The Losers –

The Congress – NCP govt. in Maharashtra – The release of the movie “My Name is Khan” is pretty uncertain as I write this. The state govt.  has been incompetent in this matter as well.

And the biggest loser I feel are We – Nothing has changed in Mumbai. And this controversy is not going to change anything either. A few weeks later everyone will forget about it. Life in Mumbai will continue as usual. The issue of “marathi manoos v/s outsiders” has been there for ages ! Has anything changed or affected in Mumbai any way ? In my opinion, it hasn’t .

I come to the issue of how we choose our candidates and what issues do we vote on (I had blogged about this earlier). I still believe, it because we as voters give significance to such non issues (such as religionalism, caste, langaue etc) , that the political parties get the courage to go out and carry out all these fiascos. I am certain, the day we stop voting on such non issues and start voting on real issues, these fiascos will automatically start dying down.

Once again I reiterate that I am not supporting any one on this issue. I just wish that we have smart and educated voters, who choose good candidates to serve us.

How do we choose a candidate ?


The thought of writing about this came to my mind during a discussion on Raj Thackeray, I had on Facebook with a friend. So how do we vote ? How do we choose the candidate for whom we cast our vote ? I think most of us do us in a way wrong way. When we vote we consider (non) issues such as caste or language or from which region he is or even to which political party he belongs to instead of focusing on issues such as “roti, kapda, makan, bilji, paani, sadak” etc (i.e. food, housing, electricity, water, roads etc). And it because we “support” these non issues, politicians get a chance to make merry.

Take Raj Thackeray’s case – people says he is arrogant, violent, he beats up people on the street and no one does anything. All we do is crib about it amongst ourselves, in online forums and so on.  Why does this happen ? Its because of us. Since there are people who support his divisive politics, he does all of this and even gets away with it. I think if people would stop supporting his divisive politics, this will definitely die down.

So when we need to question the candidate, what he has done, what he plans to do if elected, read his manifesto and choose a right candidate we end not doing that. I wonder how many of us even read the candidate’s manifesto ? And how many us do what is shown in the video ?

I guess most of the things that happen because of “politicians”, we have brought upon ourselves, because of the issues we support while we vote and the way we choose our candidates.

Politics


A person learns about politics at the grass-root levels. He learns the trade of tricks at a young age at the grass root level say at the college or university level, and he carries that forward when he moves on to higher level like city, state and national level politics. Looking at the way things happening in the Indian Student’s association elections in UMBC and some other elections that took place in Indian Universities recently, I am not surprised at the state of Indian politics. The future also probably remains dim.